wydanie drukowane/printed edition – ISSN 1689-5010
wydanie online/online/edition – eISSN 2720-524X

Uniwersytet Rzeszowski
Centrum Dokumentacji Współczesnej
Sztuki Sakralnej
pl. Ofiar Getta 4-5/35, 35-002 Rzeszów
tel. +48 17 872 20 98

Pobierz artykuł w pdf

The Editors
Sacred art is a gratifying topic of – not only scholarly – reflexion. The works of art inspired by religion or in any other way associated with religious cult are perceived, apprehended and interpreted depending on the outlook, education or sensibility of the person who writes about them.
At the same time, the spectrum of expectations of sacred art formulated by the faithful and the God seekers, as well as the strength of disagreement expressed by its opponents are the evidence of the importance attached to religion-related works of art by both the defenders of traditional cultural values and those who wish to destroy the existing principles for the sake of building a new order.
The current issue of “Sacrum et Decorum”, next to presenting articles introducing or interpreting the works of Polish artists, is dominated by problems related to religious art and culture of France, a country with which Poland has for centuries maintained particularly close artistic relations.
The paper of Piotr Krasny, which opens the present volume, discusses the importance of François-René de Chateaubriand’s Génie du Christianisme in post-Revolutionary France of the first decades of the nineteenth century. It is common understanding that the work of the French writer contributed a great deal to the dissemination of ultra-conservative and traditionalist attitudes towards religious art. It is very telling that, especially in Poland, tradition and backwardness have until now defined the scope of expectations of many faithful who, while accepting the exclusively historic forms in sacred architecture, by definition reject any attempts at introducing into churches and religious cult new means of artistic expression.
The Catholic Church is an excellent custodian of centuries-old heritage of sacred art and to some degree still draws on the tradition in search for incentives to encourage the development of sacred art. In this direction follows the article of Cédric Lesec in the present issue of “Sacrum et Decorum” focussing on over fifty years of activity of the “Zodiaque” publishing house established by the Benedictines from the abbey of Sainte-Marie de la Pierre-qui-Vire.
Numerous exponents of the renewal of sacred art tried to join forces with outstanding contemporary artists, regardless of their religious outlook. This co-operation resulted in the creation of such works of art as the chapel of Notre-Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. The history of its interpretation has yielded a vast and interesting array of literature. Early examples of reception and scholarly analysis of this edifice – interesting both because of the high artistic quality of Le Corbusier’s work and of the variety of perspectives and research analyses employed, have been discussed in an article by Cezary Wąs, of which the first part appears in the present issue.
At the same time, the Church concentrated rather on caring for cultural heritage, neglects to some degree the area of scholarly investigation of contemporary sacred art. The revival of such activities in the circles of theologians and scholars associated with Church-based academic institutions, dating from the period shortly before the Second Vatican Council and slightly afterwards, has gradually waned. Serious, systematic research on the theology of pictorial representation is missing in Poland, and it is mostly art historians and artists who participate in scholarly conferences and meetings devoted to sacred art. In view of the insufficiency of theological discourse dealing with the presence of art in the contemporary Church, the editors of “Sacrum et Decorum” will strive to secure the contributions of authors who would examine some interesting issues from theological perspective. This current has been initiated by the paper of Fr Andrzej Królikowski presenting some postulates and dealing with general issues that may serve as a starting point for further and more extensive studies.
Among articles dealing with art of particular interest are always statements of artists. One of them is Tadeusz Boruta, a painter and philosopher, during the martial state activist in the independent culture movement. In the present issue of “Sacrum et Decorum” Boruta plays a dual role: of an artist whose works have been discussed by Michał Haake and Grażyna Ryba, and of an author of a paper examining the most recent depictions of the Last Supper in Polish painting. In future we shall try to systematically acquaint the Readers with the work and comments of other, equally interesting artists dealing with religious art.
In the previous issue we have initiated a series devoted to unknown, unrealised or forgotten artworks inspired by religion or cult-related. We shall often return to this topic as we consider it to be of particular importance for painting a full picture of sacred art of the last two hundred years. The most recent issue features a few articles that continue this series. On the basis of archival sources, Andrzej Laskowski has recreated the architecture of the Franciscan church in Jasło, destroyed by the Nazis during World War II. Maria Żychowska has outlined the artistic personality of Fr Piotr Cholewka – a designer of stained-glass windows barely known in Poland, who works mostly abroad, mainly in France.
The editors of “Sacrum et Decorum” wish to extend their thanks to the Readers for their signs of appreciation we have received. It is our hope that the most recent volume of the journal will be met with equal generosity and interest, as were its previous issues.
Translated by Joanna Wolańska

The EditorsSacred art is a gratifying topic of – not only scholarly – reflexion. The works of art inspired by religion or in any other way associated with religious cult are perceived, apprehended and interpreted depending on the outlook, education or sensibility of the person who writes about them.At the same time, the spectrum of expectations of sacred art formulated by the faithful and the God seekers, as well as the strength of disagreement expressed by its opponents are the evidence of the importance attached to religion-related works of art by both the defenders of traditional cultural values and those who wish to destroy the existing principles for the sake of building a new order.The current issue of “Sacrum et Decorum”, next to presenting articles introducing or interpreting the works of Polish artists, is dominated by problems related to religious art and culture of France, a country with which Poland has for centuries maintained particularly close artistic relations.The paper of Piotr Krasny, which opens the present volume, discusses the importance of François-René de Chateaubriand’s Génie du Christianisme in post-Revolutionary France of the first decades of the nineteenth century. It is common understanding that the work of the French writer contributed a great deal to the dissemination of ultra-conservative and traditionalist attitudes towards religious art. It is very telling that, especially in Poland, tradition and backwardness have until now defined the scope of expectations of many faithful who, while accepting the exclusively historic forms in sacred architecture, by definition reject any attempts at introducing into churches and religious cult new means of artistic expression.The Catholic Church is an excellent custodian of centuries-old heritage of sacred art and to some degree still draws on the tradition in search for incentives to encourage the development of sacred art. In this direction follows the article of Cédric Lesec in the present issue of “Sacrum et Decorum” focussing on over fifty years of activity of the “Zodiaque” publishing house established by the Benedictines from the abbey of Sainte-Marie de la Pierre-qui-Vire.Numerous exponents of the renewal of sacred art tried to join forces with outstanding contemporary artists, regardless of their religious outlook. This co-operation resulted in the creation of such works of art as the chapel of Notre-Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. The history of its interpretation has yielded a vast and interesting array of literature. Early examples of reception and scholarly analysis of this edifice – interesting both because of the high artistic quality of Le Corbusier’s work and of the variety of perspectives and research analyses employed, have been discussed in an article by Cezary Wąs, of which the first part appears in the present issue.At the same time, the Church concentrated rather on caring for cultural heritage, neglects to some degree the area of scholarly investigation of contemporary sacred art. The revival of such activities in the circles of theologians and scholars associated with Church-based academic institutions, dating from the period shortly before the Second Vatican Council and slightly afterwards, has gradually waned. Serious, systematic research on the theology of pictorial representation is missing in Poland, and it is mostly art historians and artists who participate in scholarly conferences and meetings devoted to sacred art. In view of the insufficiency of theological discourse dealing with the presence of art in the contemporary Church, the editors of “Sacrum et Decorum” will strive to secure the contributions of authors who would examine some interesting issues from theological perspective. This current has been initiated by the paper of Fr Andrzej Królikowski presenting some postulates and dealing with general issues that may serve as a starting point for further and more extensive studies.Among articles dealing with art of particular interest are always statements of artists. One of them is Tadeusz Boruta, a painter and philosopher, during the martial state activist in the independent culture movement. In the present issue of “Sacrum et Decorum” Boruta plays a dual role: of an artist whose works have been discussed by Michał Haake and Grażyna Ryba, and of an author of a paper examining the most recent depictions of the Last Supper in Polish painting. In future we shall try to systematically acquaint the Readers with the work and comments of other, equally interesting artists dealing with religious art.In the previous issue we have initiated a series devoted to unknown, unrealised or forgotten artworks inspired by religion or cult-related. We shall often return to this topic as we consider it to be of particular importance for painting a full picture of sacred art of the last two hundred years. The most recent issue features a few articles that continue this series. On the basis of archival sources, Andrzej Laskowski has recreated the architecture of the Franciscan church in Jasło, destroyed by the Nazis during World War II. Maria Żychowska has outlined the artistic personality of Fr Piotr Cholewka – a designer of stained-glass windows barely known in Poland, who works mostly abroad, mainly in France.The editors of “Sacrum et Decorum” wish to extend their thanks to the Readers for their signs of appreciation we have received. It is our hope that the most recent volume of the journal will be met with equal generosity and interest, as were its previous issues.Translated by Joanna Wolańska

Skip to content